NAFTA - North American Free Trade Art, 2010 - ongoingphotographic triptychs series, archival prints, edition of ten

This series groups three iconic images that were taken in Canada, Mexico and the United States. This work elucidates my ongoing artistic interests and intentions to use formal conceits to underline conceptual implications.

The exhibition - NAFTA – North American Free Trade Art (2010) situates itself between the real and surreal. The photos taken in the three different countries are 'off the hip' shooting of street images – a captured everyday reality. However, coupled and cropped, they function as mechanisms for pointing out both difference and similarity. By not knowing which photo is taken in which country the viewers are challenged to question their own impressions of those places. The exoticism of the unknown is examined through snippets of scenes, peepholes into the unknown. The deliberate slicing of the photo plane, in thirds, though not always equally, emphasizes the problematic construct of nationhood.

The term NAFTA implies a coming together, an agreement to co-operate between three nations. As Canadians have learnt through debacles like the softwood lumber dispute, the reality of the agreement is a far cry from the written and publicized intentions of the pact. The images in this series are 'forced' together, sitting uneasily, but also with need for each other to support the whole composition.
Curator's Essay

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NAFTA - North American Free Trade Art, 2010 - ongoingphotographic triptychs series, archival prints, edition of ten

This series groups three iconic images that were taken in Canada, Mexico and the United States. This work elucidates my ongoing artistic interests and intentions to use formal conceits to underline conceptual implications.

The exhibition - NAFTA – North American Free Trade Art (2010) situates itself between the real and surreal. The photos taken in the three different countries are 'off the hip' shooting of street images – a captured everyday reality. However, coupled and cropped, they function as mechanisms for pointing out both difference and similarity. By not knowing which photo is taken in which country the viewers are challenged to question their own impressions of those places. The exoticism of the unknown is examined through snippets of scenes, peepholes into the unknown. The deliberate slicing of the photo plane, in thirds, though not always equally, emphasizes the problematic construct of nationhood.

The term NAFTA implies a coming together, an agreement to co-operate between three nations. As Canadians have learnt through debacles like the softwood lumber dispute, the reality of the agreement is a far cry from the written and publicized intentions of the pact. The images in this series are 'forced' together, sitting uneasily, but also with need for each other to support the whole composition.
Curator's Essay